Using Mythology in Current Writing


Have you ever taken a writing class? I have, I’ve taken several, and besides the course’s where they give me writing prompts and critique’s, and grammar help. There always seems to be a prevailing tone that comes from the. “Write what you know?” if you are an author or an author want to be, you’ve heard this phrase. Now I’m a paranormal/sci-fi/fantasy/urban-fantasy author. And I like to think I’ve been around the block a couple of times but to be honest I haven’t run into many vampires, werewolves, reapers, or trackers, or anything else all that paranormal/sci-fi/fantasy. Although a couple of my past bosses could have passed for dragons, that’s a different blog post.

Anyway… what I’m getting at is writing what I know would probably bore my readers to tears. And it certainly wouldn’t sell any books. So that little bit of advice… honestly left me sitting on my hands for my twenties and most of my thirties.  Then I realized something. Write what you know? Is relative.

When writing fiction, you need to build a story on some type of foundation. That is where for me writing from Mythology comes in. I like to pull in an aspect of reality by threads of different types of Mythology.

How do I do this?

First of all, what is Mythology? Mythology is defined as collection of myths, especially one belonging to a particular religious or cultural tradition. So really what is a myth? A myth is a tradition or a story concerning the early history of a people or explaining some natural phenomenon, and typically involving supernatural beings or events. Can also be known as folk tales or folklore, fables, and or lore. Broken down within regions and tribes. This opens up so many different avenues for writers because the threads for plots are limitless. The only thing holding you back is your own imagination.


Mythology is by its own definition a collection of stories. Taking those stories and dissecting them and then retelling them is the ultimate in storytelling.

For my books, I have taken several myths from Greek Mythology, Atlantis Mythology, Biblical Mythology, and the storytelling and mythology of Dante’s Inferno. The greatest part of being an author and a storyteller is being able to combine the mythologies and stories to fit around my characters and imagination. I believe that is the muse of the modern day paranormal/sci-fi/fantasy author.

So when I am told: “Write what you know.” I go within and say. “What if?” and “How about?” and “Maybe if.” Because it’s not always about what you know, sometimes it’s about what you make-be-leave.






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